Projects
September 2016 / August 2018

Accommodate Renewable Energy in Interconnected Electricity System: an Economic Perspective - RES INV

The objectives of RES INV is first to investigate the role of investments in transmission network and electricity storage needed to meet the overall EU targets at minimum cost. Second, the role of market design and consumer demand will be also investigated.

RES INV is a project within the Marie Curie European Individual Fellowships (IF-EF) scheme for Experienced Researchers of the Horizon 2020 research and innovation framework programme. The project is developed by Dr. Valeria Di Cosmo, under the direct scientific supervision of Dr. Andrea Bigano.

The objectives of RES INV is first to investigate the role of investments in transmission network and electricity storage needed to meet the overall EU targets at minimum cost. Second, the role of market design and consumer demand will be also investigated.

The European Union (EU) has set ambitious greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) targets: 20% lower than 1990 levels by 2020, rising to 40% lower by 2030 and 85% lower by 2050. Moreover, a target of at least 27% on the share of renewable energy consumed in EU is set for 2030. To facilitate renewable integration, the EU is implementing the European  Single Electricity Market (ESEM). The efficient use of electricity interconnection envisaged by the ESEM can mitigate the system instability caused by a high penetration of intermittent renewables; however the challenging targets on emissions and renewable generation add constraints that need to be evaluated.
First, I will examine how transmission lines and demand management interact with renewable generation. In particular, I will investigate how interconnection affects benefits and costs for the consumers in the European Union. I will also examine the effects of the system electrification (i.e. electric heating, storage, electric vehicles) both on interconnection choices and on renewables integration.
Second, I will be interested in understanding whether a market structure that simplifies renewable integration exists for electricity systems with large renewable penetration. Finally, on the demand side, consumers will become less dependent from the grid, as new technologies like solar PV and electric storage become available. It will be crucial to understand how these technologies interact with the national grid as this will have strong implication for the security of supply of the electricity system. Moreover, it will be important to also analyse how the consumers will react to these new technologies, focusing on the consumer's behaviour and the response of consumers to the electrification of the heating and the transport sectors. This will determine the success of policy interventions made everywhere in Europe to promote the reduction of the GHG emissions.

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