Seminars & webinars
6 June 2016

ICCG Webinar on: "The Transferability of Economic Instruments to Mitigate Drought or Other Water Scarcity Impacts"


Location:

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Event's Timetable:

h. 15.30 Online Webinar

Information:

Economic instruments are varied, and their uptake differs depending on the legal, social, economic and environmental context under consideration. In some contexts pricing and public subsidization form a basis for mitigating impacts, while in others private risk-mitigation arrangements such as insurance and water trade are used. Often all of these are present as a broad-spectrum approach to the issues involved. In this discussion, examples of these instruments will be provided together with insights into their advantages and disadvantages in the real-world. Enabling and constraining factors will also be raised and debated by the participants in an effort to identify where lessons could be learned across different contexts that share water management problems of a wicked nature.

Speakers:

Adam Loch, Centre for Global Food and Resources, The University of Adelaide and David Adamson, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.



Dr Adam Loch is an agricultural/natural resource economist with research interests in water trade and reallocation, irrigator decision making, climate change adaptation and drought impacts, private and institutional transaction costs, and applied economic policy input. Adam is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Global Food and Resources and currently funded under a 2015 Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship until 2017 to focus on transaction costs in Australian water reform; particularly those experienced in the Murray-Darling Basin over recent decades.
Recently Adam has won additional UNESCO funding to explore a water market readiness assessment framework developed in conjunction with colleagues at the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia and the Australian National University. He will be using some of that funding to capture European data on the framework during his visit. Further, Adam has also recently won funding to support collaboration and water reform and management lesson-sharing between Australia and partners in Europe through the European Union Centre for Global Affairs. This will enable him to strengthen partnerships in the EU to drive knowledge transfers over the next two years.
Adam is also an Adjunct Senior Research Fellow at the School of Commerce in the University of South Australia and is currently the President of the South Australian Branch of the Australian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society (AARES).

 



Dr David Adamson is an agricultural/resource economist who is normally found at The University of Queensland (UQ), playing in the School of Economics. David has a history of tinkering around to see how decision makers respond to risk and uncertainty derived from issues such as climate change, water resources and biosecurity. David won a 2016 DECRA Fellowship and for the next 3 years he will be concentrating on water economics in the Murray-Darling Basin.
Last year David travelled overseas by leveraging his Endeavour Research Fellowship with a Research Fellowship from the Australian Institute for Business and Economics to collaborate on the Trans-Domain COST-Action project titled ‘Network for Evaluation of One Health’ project he has in the United Kingdom. David is an Affiliate of the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, listed as a member of UQ’s Global Change Institute’s College of Experts, and was President of the Queensland’s Branch of the Australian Agricultural & Resource Economics Society (AARES) from 2013 to 2015.

 



Moderator: Carlos Dionisio Pérez Blanco, FEEM

Abstract

Economic instruments are varied, and their uptake differs depending on the legal, social, economic and environmental context under consideration. In some contexts pricing and public subsidization form a basis for mitigating impacts, while in others private risk-mitigation arrangements such as insurance and water trade are used. Often all of these are present as a broad-spectrum approach to the issues involved. In this discussion, examples of these instruments will be provided together with insights into their advantages and disadvantages in the real-world. Enabling and constraining factors will also be raised and debated by the participants in an effort to identify where lessons could be learned across different contexts that share water management problems of a wicked nature.

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